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What Should I Do If I Fall at a Friend’s House?

05/24/2021
Blog
BY

Accidents where people are injured due to unsafe property conditions and slip and fall accidents happen every day. It’s very common for these accidents to occur while visiting the home of a friend, neighbor, or relative.

If this happens to you, you’re likely thinking, “I really don’t want to sue my [friend, neighbor, or relative], but who is going to pay all these medical bills.” You don’t want to damage your relationship with the person, but what do you do if the injury has caused considerable damage in your life and is costing more than you can afford?

If you’ve been injured by unsafe conditions at a friend’s, neighbor’s, or relative’s property, let an experienced Florida accident lawyer at Searcy Denney help. We’ll handle your claims with an understanding of your particular circumstances.

The Answer: Insurance

There’s a common misunderstanding when it comes to insurance and accidents. The individual property owner isn’t responsible for your lost wages, medical expenses, or pain and suffering — their homeowner’s insurance is.

Insuring a property is meant to financially protect the property owner in the event of an accident. An insurance company’s job is to deal with claims brought by and against its policyholders. Don’t think of it as suing your friend, neighbor, or relative; think of it as suing their insurance company, which they may not like anyway.

So What Should You Do?

Do the same things you’d do if the property owner were just another stranger:

  1. Seek Medical Help. If you need emergency medical assistance for your injuries, have someone call 911. When emergency responders arrive, cooperate with them. Go to the hospital if told to, and even if you do not go to the hospital immediately, visit a doctor within 48 hours.
  2. Report Your Accident. Speak to the property owner, let them know that you fell and were injured, and ask for an accident report. 
  3. Start a File. Keep a copy of your accident report and all other documentation and correspondence between you and the property owner. Keep all bills, reports, and receipts connected to your medical treatment, absences from work, or any changes in your life caused by your fall and injury. 
  4. Gather Witness Information. If there were witnesses, get their contact information and their version of the accident.
  5. Take Photos. Take pictures of anything that can help show how the accident occurred. 
  6. Make Notes. Write down what happened during the day leading up to your accident. Keep notes, or better yet, a diary, about your recovery, including medical treatment, pain, setbacks, effects on your mobility, missed work, and activities or special occasions you missed because of your injuries.
  7. Don’t Publicize Your Experience. Avoid social media, and do not say anything about your accident. All discussions of your accident and resulting injuries should be between you, your attorneys, and your doctors.
  8. Be Wary of Insurance Companies. You will likely hear from an insurance adjuster after being injured. Their job is to undervalue your claim. Say as little as possible, and do not agree to a recorded interview or a signed statement.
  9. Understand Your Legal Options. Contact a Florida accident lawyer at Searcy Denney immediately.

Let a Florida Accident Lawyer Help if You Have Been Injured on Someone Else’s Property in Florida

If you have been injured on the property of a friend, neighbor, or relative in Florida, let us handle this uncomfortable situation for you. Simply contact a Florida accident lawyer at Searcy Denney for your free consultation. We work on a contingency fee basis.

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"Every question that I had was answered in mere minutes and the follow through that the staff, secretaries and attorneys had was superior. I have dealt with many, many firms that have all disappointed me and Searcy Denney was by far the most thorough - I highly recommend them!"
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